The death of the mainframe has often been proclaimed. But these are dinosaurs that simply refuse to die out. Nor is that particularly surprising because the mainframe offers an unbeatable combination of high availability, performance, scalability, security and large transaction volumes in the modern age of cloud computing and big data. Banks and insurance companies, in particular, still rely on this unique package. The software installed on the mainframe represents the biggest block of costs here. As the only large provider of the hardware and much of the relevant software, IBM knows how to exploit its monopoly skillfully, which leads to lock-in effects and a multitude of other difficulties.

  • Little transparency in the OIO/ESSO contracts because of the way all of the products are bundled together with a package price and no breakdown of the individual components (bottom-line price à total list price volume less an overall discount).
  • No awareness of the actual costs at product level.
  • Numerous complex license models.
  • No information about comparative standard market prices for products.
  • Determination of the actual license requirements (key basic decisions here: which license version? Buy or lease? Which license system?).
  • Breakdown of the overall discount and application to the individual products.
  • Determination of the work involved in conversion, the time frame for conversion and the costs following migration of the system-variable application.
  • Benchmarking against comparable contracts.
  • Evaluation of the contract conditions with the help of the ISCI analysis developed by Intero (ISCI = IBM Software Contract Index).
  • Precise knowledge of the existing discounts and comparability of the contract condition.
  • Exact determination of the future license needs.
  • Purchase and extension of maintenance only for licenses that are really needed.